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SEAFWA 2018 has ended
The following schedule is from the 72nd Annual Conference of the Southeastern Association of Fish & Wildlife Agencies which was held October 21-24, 2018 in Mobile, Alabama. 
Tuesday, October 23 • 4:00pm - 4:20pm
SYMPOSIUM-04: Range-wide Status Modeling to Accelerate Conservation of At-Risk Species in the Longleaf System

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AUTHORS: Brian Crawford, Georgia Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, University of Georgia; John C. Maerz, Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, University of Georgia; Clinton T. Moore, U.S. Geological Survey, Georgia Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, University of Georgia; D. Todd Jones-Farrand, Gulf Coastal Plains & Ozarks Landscape Conservation Cooperative; Mike Harris, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Region 4

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is commissioned with reviewing the status of more than 300 wildlife species in the Southeast for potential listing under the Endangered Species Act. The longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) ecological system supports many priority at-risk species designated for review, including five species of herpetofauna: the gopher tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus), gopher frog (Lithobates capito), striped newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus), southern hognose snake (Heterodon simus), and Florida pine snake (Pituophis melanoleucus mugitus). With federal, state, and other partners, we are assessing the statuses of these five at-risk species to inform where and how to invest in conservation resources. This work addresses three objectives: 1) strengthen partnerships with species experts and decision-makers and use their input and data to guide species models, 2) develop comprehensive, range-wide models to predict current and future trends in habitat conditions and species statuses under threat and management scenarios, and 3) develop a structured decision-making framework that identifies optimal decisions for species and other socioeconomic objectives. We discuss progress and challenges in developing species distribution and persistence models, including incorporating expert opinion to mitigate data limitations, reduce uncertainty, and validate model estimates. Research products have begun to identify priority areas based on the distribution of species records, suitable habitat, and land protection status at local, state-wide, and range-wide scales. These results will aid regional partners in implementing effective conservation strategies and inform listing decisions of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

Tuesday October 23, 2018 4:00pm - 4:20pm
Grand Bay I

Attendees (6)